Marketplace Leaders

Paid Intercession: Good or Bad?

Epaphras, who Paul states to the Colossians “is one of you and a servant of Christ Jesus. . . . He is always wrestling in prayer for you, that you may stand firm in all the will of God, mature and fully assured.” Colossians 4:12

 

Because we’ve been entrenched in the “secular versus sacred” model for so long, it can

be difficult for us to view our work as a ministry and workplace believers as

missionaries in the 9 to 5 Window. However, God tells us clearly that we are to glorify

God in all that we do (see Col. 3:17,24). One way we can do this is through intercessory

prayer, which can be characterized as an intense type of prayer for others (see Eph. 6:18;

Col. 4:12), the priestly calling of all believers (see 1 Pet. 2:5; Exod. 19:6) and the Holy

Spirit praying in us (see Rom. 8:26-27). Having people pray for us to fulfill our purpose

and calling in our workplaces is consistent with the will of God for every individual.

 

Imagine if all corporations had a director of corporate intercession as a paid

position. I am pleased to tell you that in at least one case, this is already happening.

Darlene Maisano is a full-time intercessor for the marketplace and a paid intercessor for

several businesses. She is paid as a consultant would be paid. She sits in business

meetings, quietly praying and “listening.” She has authored the only resource I know of

on the subject, Breaking Open the Doors of Success Through Marketplace Intercession. Here

are her thoughts on the importance of workplace intercession:

 

Through the birthing and establishing of the Church, nothing has ever

been accomplished on earth without prayer and intercession. And with

the restoration of the workplace, intercession is a key to bridging the gap,

making a way and nullifying the shortage of laborers in the Kingdom.

 

Whereas we once thought of those involved in politics, economics,

religion, and the military as the ones controlling the earth, today we

recognize the enormous influence wielded by those in the workplace.

As a workplace intercessor for numerous national and international

businesses, I have experienced the importance of interceding on their

behalf. Favor, wisdom, financial gain and well-being have been

manifested and evident in peoples’ lives and businesses. I am also seeing a

growing number of workplace intercessors stepping up to the plate

saying, “That’s my calling.”1

 

While the idea of a workplace intercessor may be a new concept for us, we need

to remember the examples we find in the New Testament of believers praying for one

another. One such example is Epaphras, who Paul states to the Colossians “is one of

you and a servant of Christ Jesus. . . . He is always wrestling in prayer for you, that you

may stand firm in all the will of God, mature and fully assured” (Col. 4:12).

 

Let me give you a modern example of what I am describing as intercessory

prayer in the workplace.

 

Compensating Intercessors?

The idea of compensating intercessors by paying them for their time is something that is

still in its developmental stage and may represent a new and unusual concept to us.

However, we need to move past the roadblock of thinking that it’s inappropriate to pay

people to pray and realize that those who are spending time praying for a business

need to be compensated in the same manner as any other person who is working on its

behalf.

 

The models for employing and compensating intercessors are varied depending

on the circumstance, the people involved and the skill and ability of the intercessor.

Here are a few examples of some of these models:

 

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I'd never heard of a Paid Intercessor employed for sole purpose of interceding for a company! I can’t really conclude whether it’s good or bad
However scripture says, "Do not muzzle the ox while it is treading out the grain," and "The worker deserves his wages." (1 Timothy 5:18 NIV) God leads us as individuals (differently);I’d love to first hear out the employer who’s led to hire an intercessor before forming an opinion about paid intercession.
I strongly believe that, wherever God places us, He expects us to intercede & we’ll be held accountable for the people God brings into our lives e.g. workmates. “From one man he made every nation of men, that they should inhabit the whole earth; and he determined the times set for them and the exact places where they should live. God did this so that men would seek him and perhaps reach out for him and find him, though he is not far from each one of us.” Acts 17:26-27
My name is Charles and my wife Liz and I have a company called WISE Ministries where companies engage us to coach, consult and intercede for their spiritual needs. To me, having done this for over five years along with seeing the benefits of favor and breakthrough that are bestowed upon our client companies and leaders, there is no question that God greatly blesses and honors what we do for our clients. I will have much more to say on upcoming threads but the simple answer to the questions of "is this biblical and right?" I answer a resounding "yes" and our client leaders would also answer in this way. Check out www.CoachMyBusiness.com/testimonials.php for some examples.

Charles Robinson

Donna Juliana said:
I'd never heard of a Paid Intercessor employed for sole purpose of interceding for a company! I can’t really conclude whether it’s good or bad
However scripture says, "Do not muzzle the ox while it is treading out the grain," and "The worker deserves his wages." (1 Timothy 5:18 NIV) God leads us as individuals (differently);I’d love to first hear out the employer who’s led to hire an intercessor before forming an opinion about paid intercession.
I strongly believe that, wherever God places us, He expects us to intercede & we’ll be held accountable for the people God brings into our lives e.g. workmates. “From one man he made every nation of men, that they should inhabit the whole earth; and he determined the times set for them and the exact places where they should live. God did this so that men would seek him and perhaps reach out for him and find him, though he is not far from each one of us.” Acts 17:26-27
Something in me is fighting this. Not sure where it is coming from - maybe it's my past teaching and what I know, or what I don't know. But one thing I identify with is the poor and would it be that GOD, because I am wealthy enough or because I can afford to pay someone to pray for me, would be more likely then to prosper me? And if indeed I do prosper because of this, then what hope is there for the poor?
If I may weigh in on this discussion this seems to be a matter left to the companies involved. If they want to pay people to pray that is fine and if they choose not to that is fine. for some reason we seem to want to get in one ditch or ther other. If there is no clear cut mandate for either let each company and business owner decide in his heart what is right. The first thing you know we will be saying that unless a company has a paid intercessor God will not bless that business or we will build a another tradition and go to selling prayers. My word is if you feel that God wants you to hire intercessors then do it. If you are not led to don't. Don't be placed in bondage either way.
Hi everyone from Sydney Australia. I am a business owner and great supporter of paid intercessors which we have had for two years via www.businessblessings.com.au

I am in favour of it for a number of reasons
1) Every person should be able to utilise the gift God gives them and make a living- Why should it be any different to a pastor getting paid.
2) It enables to intercessors to focus and grow in their gift rather than try and fit it in on the side or when they are tired.
3) When you pay someone for a job it honours them. Would it be ridiculous to ask our attorney or accountant not to charge us if they are Christian or Non Christian. Why should it be any different for people who are called to intercession. I think that is the key- if you can see the grace of God on a person then they should be released in it and one of the ways is by allowing them to earn a living from it and support their families



I think we need to distinguish between different levels of prayer
eg our housechurch and friends pray for us but a paid intercessor spends a long period of time in consistent intercession.

We have only had a fantastic experience with it both relationally and in it confirming what God has put in our hearts.
Carol,
The bible says that money is the root of all sorts of evil things. It also says that money is the answer to everything. I think it comes down to the actual intercessor whether they are supported financially in any other way or not.

Carol Roberts said:
How can people say that they are paid to pray....It`s a bit like asking Jesus if He wants to be paid for dying on the cross for us...Gods Gifts are Gods Gifts and as such should be Freely given,I find it troublesome in a world such as ours that money is the foundation for every thing,God freely gave,We should set the example,as Jesus said,"you cannot serve both,you can have the one or the other,Money is the root of all evil....Even in the workplace freely it was given,freely we should give.
The bible says the 'love of money is the root'. Being prosperous does not need to equate to personal aggrandizement because that can lead to temptation and imbalance in one's life priorities -- God, spouse, family, work, ministry.

As a business owner considering paid intercession, the concerns I feel would be addressed are

a) ensuring someone is concentrating on prayer for the times when my personal focus or that of my executive team is effected by crisis, success or any other common way to take your eye off the ball;

b) as our company has a growth objective (to create jobs and expand resources), our growth increases operational risk due to size. At what point does a founder's wife, or the founder him/herself, need assistance in such a crucial area as prayer for purposes of confirming

c) intercession is a form of 'multitude of counsel'; while the business owner must own the decision

d) I am definitely a fan of 'a worker is worthy of his/her wages' -- that's how we all earn our living

Clearly, this is new territory... which means change... which means discomfort. In the early going, it will be necessary for both parties (business and intercessor) to work at being circumspect, setting appropriate boundaries and feeling out the relationship.

If we shy away from consideration, as opposed to commitment, we could fail to unlock a key to optimizing and securing business longevity. We should be spiritually sensitive, especially in a multitude of counsel, to determine whether the individual, corporation or issue at hand is conflicted due to money being in the picture.

For these reasons, each business will need to determine for themselves. For those that develop testimonies such as shared in this thread, it can serve as lessons and the necessary fruit to accept a new expression of ministry within business.

Anna Hansson said:
Carol,
The bible says that money is the root of all sorts of evil things. It also says that money is the answer to everything. I think it comes down to the actual intercessor whether they are supported financially in any other way or not. Carol Roberts said:
How can people say that they are paid to pray....It`s a bit like asking Jesus if He wants to be paid for dying on the cross for us...Gods Gifts are Gods Gifts and as such should be Freely given,I find it troublesome in a world such as ours that money is the foundation for every thing,God freely gave,We should set the example,as Jesus said,"you cannot serve both,you can have the one or the other,Money is the root of all evil....Even in the workplace freely it was given,freely we should give.
I was just wondering how is the performance of a paid intercessor measured by his/her employer? Are they (paid intercessors) at some point laid off, fired?
At what point does the employer decide to let the paid intercessor go?
Hi Donna,

I think the main issue is being in relationship- the kingdom is built on relationships first then function.
Obviously the intercessor needs to be called to the business and the evidence of grace on their life and the value of their intercession. If it is primarily relational then the actual paid work can be assessed at any time because the relationship is not at risk.

In our case- the intercessor does not work in the business they live 1000 km away and do not speak to us so the words she hears from God are more accurate. We speak to Wesley Leake the head of Business Blessings who provides more of a fathering and encouragement as well as go through the monthly intercession report.

Donna Juliana said:
I was just wondering how is the performance of a paid intercessor measured by his/her employer? Are they (paid intercessors) at some point laid off, fired?
At what point does the employer decide to let the paid intercessor go?
Thanks Justin

Justin Pagotto said:
Hi Donna,

I think the main issue is being in relationship- the kingdom is built on relationships first then function.
Obviously the intercessor needs to be called to the business and the evidence of grace on their life and the value of their intercession. If it is primarily relational then the actual paid work can be assessed at any time because the relationship is not at risk.

In our case- the intercessor does not work in the business they live 1000 km away and do not speak to us so the words she hears from God are more accurate. We speak to Wesley Leake the head of Business Blessings who provides more of a fathering and encouragement as well as go through the monthly intercession report.

Donna Juliana said:
I was just wondering how is the performance of a paid intercessor measured by his/her employer? Are they (paid intercessors) at some point laid off, fired?
At what point does the employer decide to let the paid intercessor go?
I don't really think the question here has much to do with right or wrong. It is always right to at least WANT to compensate someone for time spent on doing anything you ask them to do on your behalf, especially if that person would not being doing it had you never asked them to.The bigger question is to the issue of necessity. How necessary is it to hire an intercessor for your organization when there are hundreds of thousands of people who would be willing to pray for you for free? I run a site called NeedPrayer.Com where people are praying for others all the time. The Holy Spirit is faithful to work through the Body, so no one person should be the staple of your corporate intercession - we are all empowered and encouraged to interceed. So, for my companies, I lean on my prayer network of people who feel they are called to pray through the site I mentioned. It makes answers to the prayers less of an issue of "prophetic interference" (people trying to force their prayers to come true) and makes me have to trust that God hears our collective prayers and responds regardless the voice that utters them.
I own a small business that has recently hired two part time intercessorsthat pray once a week. I am also an intercessor who has been praying the heart of the Father for years. This is an area of the marketplace that must not be ignored. I've set up our intercession department within my company (called The Well House) with accountability as well as freedom. There must be balance. I am not paying the intercessors to pray for me but to pray the heart of the Father, whether that is for the marketplace, Israel, our city, etc. Intercessors have living expenses just like anyone else and to bless them with a paycheck while giving them the freedom to operate in their gift has been an amazing experience. I have no regrets about this decision.

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